Fall and Winter Tasks can bring on back pain

As Fall and winter are approaching, increasing outdoor tasks  may bring on seasonal back pain caused by raking leaves, tending the garden and flower beds and preparing them for Autumn,  or shoveling winter snow.  The repetitive twisting, bending, improper lifting, and over-exertion can be very damaging to the back.  While that occasional back pain may go away after some rest and pain medication, many back pain sufferers are not aware that seasonal activities like these can repeatedly strain the spine and may lead to more serious consequences later.

Dr. Boren recommends that we pay attention to our body mechanics when doing these types of activities, including remembering to bend the knees and lifting heavy objects straight up in one fluid motion without twisting.  After the yard care is over and back or hip pain hits, call the office and schedule an adjustment as soon as you can come in.  This will relieve the tension placed on the spine from the inflammation and swelling caused by the overexertion brought on by seasonal outdoor work.  Use ice packs on the painful portion of your spine or shoulder to reduce the swelling and inflammation, and get into our office to adjust those misalignments brought on by the seasonal work.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2005 the third leading cause of nonfatal unintentional injuries among all age groups in the United States was Unintentional Overexertion. Over 3 million injuries were caused by some type of overexertion, with over 53% of those injuries occurring among adults ages 25-54. The CDC defines overexertion as “working the body or a body part too hard, causing damage to muscle, tendon, ligament, cartilage, joint, or peripheral nerve (e.g., common cause of strains, sprains, and twisted ankles). This category includes overexertion from lifting, pushing, or pulling or from excessive force.1


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1 Ref: US Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention. www.cdc.gov.

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